Categories
New Books

First Tuesday of April Megalist!

Happy Tuesday, star bits. Guess what??? I saw my first woodchuck of the season this weekend! And if you think I didn’t whip my shirt off like Brandi Chastain and cheer in my living room when I saw it, you would be wrong. Moving on: It’s an amazing book day! If I had to choose one book to tell you about today, it would be The Five Wounds by Kirstin Valdez Quade. It’s an incredible multigenerational dysfunctional family saga set in New Mexico, and it is big and substantial and delicious. I could have easily read another 400 pages.

I did also read and love several more of today’s books, but there are still soooo many more on this list that I can’t wait to read, like Gold Diggers by Sanjena Sathian, Paradise, Nevada by Dario Diofebi, Poison Priestess by Lana Popovic, and Blow Your House Down by Gina Frangello.

As with each first Tuesday megalist, I am putting a ❤️ next to the books that I have had the chance to read and loved. You can also hear about several new releases on this week’s episode of the All the Books! Danika and I discussed The Five Wounds, Zara Hossain Is Here, Caul Baby, and more. Okay—everyone buckled in? Get ready to click your little hearts out, because here come the books! – XO, Liberty

The Five Wounds by Kirstin Valdez Quade ❤️

Allegorizings by Jan Morris

Zara Hossain Is Here by Sabina Khan

Crowe’s Requiem by Mike McCormack

The Madman’s Library: The Strangest Books, Manuscripts and Other Literary Curiosities from History by Edward Brooke-Hitching

The Night Always Comes by Willy Vlautin ❤️

An Indian among Los Indígenas: A Native Travel Memoir by Ursula Pike 

Caul Baby by Morgan Jerkins ❤️

Gold Diggers by Sanjena Sathian

My Good Son by Yang Huang

Pride and Premeditation by Tirzah Price ❤️

The Outdoor Scientist: The Wonder of Observing the Natural World by Temple Grandin, Ph.D.

The Bookstore on the Beach by Brenda Novak

Aru Shah and the City of Gold (Pandava Quartet) by Roshani Chokshi ❤️

Good Company by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney 

Merci Suárez Can’t Dance by Meg Medina

Aven Green Sleuthing Machine (Volume 1) by Dusti Bowling ❤️

Whisper Down the Lane: A Novel by Clay McLeod Chapman

First, Become Ashes by K.M. Szpara

Broken (in the best possible way) by Jenny Lawson ❤️

The God Equation: The Quest for a Theory of Everything by Michio Kaku 

Heart of Fire: An Immigrant Daughter’s Story by Mazie K. Hirono 

The Drowning Kind by Jennifer McMahon

The Girl with Stars in Her Eyes by Xio Axelro

Zoe Rosenthal Is Not Lawful Good by Nancy Werlin

Hummingbird Salamander by Jeff VanderMeer ❤️

Tower of Babel by Michael Sears

Getting It in the Head: Stories by Mike McCormack

The Light of Days: The Untold Story of Women Resistance Fighters in Hitler’s Ghettos by Judy Batalion

Peaces by Helen Oyeyemi ❤️

Your Mama by NoNieqa Ramos and Jacqueline Alcántara

Maxwell’s Demon by Steven Hall ❤️

The Nine Lives of Rose Napolitano: A Novel by Donna Freita

Face: One Square Foot of Skin by Justine Bateman

Cruella: Hello, Cruel Heart by Maureen Johnson ❤️

An Apprenticeship, or The Book of Pleasures by Clarice Lispector, Stefan Tobler (translator)

The Elephant of Belfast: A Novel by S. Kirk Walsh

Broken Horses: A Memoir by Brandi Carlile

Last Chance Texaco: Chronicles of an American Troubadour by Rickie Lee Jones

Somewhere Between Bitter and Sweet by Laekan Zea Kemp

A River Called Time by Courttia Newland

The Bohemians by Jasmin Darznik

Girl Warriors: How 25 Young Activists Are Saving the Earth by Rachel Sarah

The Last Bookshop in London: A Novel of World War II by Madeline Martin  

Lucky by Marissa Stapley

My Broken Language: A Memoir by Quiara Alegría Hudes 

Our Work Is Everywhere: An Illustrated Oral History of Queer and Trans Resistance by Syan Rose

The Cost of Knowing by Brittney Morris 

A Better Life: Poems by Randall Mann

Paradise, Nevada by Dario Diofebi

Beeswing: Losing My Way and Finding My Voice 1967-1975 by Richard Thompson

The Duke Undone by Joanna Lowell

The Hard Crowd: Essays 2000-2020 by Rachel Kushner 

Mother May I: A Novel by Joshilyn Jackson

I Have Been Buried Under Years of Dust : A Memoir of Autism and Hope by Valerie Gilpeer and Emily Grodin

We Are Each Other’s Harvest: Celebrating African American Farmers, Land, and Legacy by Natalie Baszile

From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement by Paula Yoo

I’m Waiting for You: And Other Stories by Bo-Young Kim

The Infinity Courts by Akemi Dawn Bowman

First Person Singular: Stories by Haruki Murakami, Philip Gabriel (translator)

Leonora in the Morning Light by Michaela Carter

Between the Bliss and Me by Lizzy Mason 

Blow Your House Down: A Story of Family, Feminism, and Treason by Gina Frangello

Poison Priestess (Lady Slayers) by Lana Popovic

First Responder: A Memoir of Life, Death, and Love on New York City’s Frontlines by Jennifer Murph

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

Happy Tuesday, readers! It’s been beautiful here in Maine (for the most part) the last few days. It’s nice to sit inside and read a book by the open window while listening to all the birds make noises at our feeders. They’re probably saying terrible things to one another and calling each other awful names, but, hey, it sounds pretty!

Moving on to books: I’m looking forward to a lot of today’s new releases and I hope that very soon I’ll be able to get my hands on Girlhood by Melissa Febos, All You Knead Is Love by Tanya Guerrero, and Empire of Ants: The Hidden World and Extraordinary Lives of Earth’s Tiny Conquerors by Susanne Foitzik and Olaf Fritsche. (There are actually a surprising number of nature books coming out from big publishers today, including The Nation of Plants, Rescuing the Planet, A World on the Wing, The Bedside Book of Birds, A Most Remarkable Creature, and Second Nature.)

And speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Patricia and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as The Final Revival of Opal & Nev, Of Women and Salt, Black Girl, Call Home, and more.

And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

Libertie: A Novel by Kaitlyn Greenidge

I was a big fan of Greenidge’s debut novel, We Love You, Charlie Freeman, so I was over the moon when I was able to read her new one! Set during the American Civil War, it’s about a young Black woman named Libertie. Libertie and her mother live in Brooklyn, where her mother is a doctor. Because her mother is light-skinned, she is able to pass as white, and she has high hopes that Libertie will follow in her footsteps as a doctor. But because Libertie’s skin is darker than he mother’s, she is subject to the racism of the times. And Libertie isn’t sure she actually wants to be a doctor, even though she is going to school for it. So when she meets a charming man from Haiti who tells her she would be free to live her life as she wants and as his equal if she marries him and moves back to his country, she accepts his offer. But Libertie quickly learns that life for a Black woman in Haiti is still a life of subservience. This is a wonderful novel about a young Black woman trying to find herself and freedom in a world that opposes her at every turn. And it was inspired in part by the life of one of the first Black women doctors in the United States.

Backlist bump: We Love You, Charlie Freeman by Kaitlyn Greenidge

A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance by Hanif Abdurraqib

Abdurraqib is one of today’s most incredible nonfiction writers. He’s previously released collections of essays about music and pop culture as well as a National Book Award-nominated book on a Tribe Called Quest. Now, in A Little Devil in America, he covers Black performances in America through history, such as Josephine Baker and Merry Clayton. Each performance is thoroughly examined, and its impact and significance at the time is explained. It’s a fascinating, important look at parts of history that often go unremarked. And as with all his work, Abdurraqib elegantly explains why these works resonate with him personally. I could read a million more of his essays. Abdurraqib is my new ‘automatic buy’ author, and I hope he becomes yours, too.

Backlist bump: Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest by Hanif Abdurraqib

North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholar’s Quest for the Truth Behind the Bard’s Work by Michael Blanding

I want to say up front that I have not read much Shakespeare and I don’t have a favorite dog in the ‘Shakespeare didn’t actually write his plays’ fight, but I do love reading about it! Over the centuries, a few people have been credited with his work, most famously Christopher Marlowe. This book is a look at self-taught Shakespearean scholar Dennis McCarthy and his 15-year quest to prove that Shakespeare’s works were actually written by Sir Thomas North, an Elizabethan courtier. Using technology, McCarthy claims to have found links between Will’s plays and North’s unpublished works that he says proves the bard is a fraud. Blanding presents the story in a way that lets readers decide for themselves, and whether or not you decide it’s true, the book is an epic nerdpurr about one of history’s longest-running literary mysteries.

Backlist bump: Banvard’s Folly: Thirteen Tales of People Who Didn’t Change the World by Paul Collins (This is one of my favorite nonfiction books, and includes a chapter about a Shakespeare denier, as well as many other fascinating people.)


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

It’s Tuesday—time to party! And by party, I mean talk about new books. Not that I need it to be Tuesday to do that, but today is like a weekly holiday, because of all the new releases. And it’s also like a holiday, because think of all the authors having book birthdays each week! HAPPY BIRTHDAY. I’m looking forward to a lot of today’s new releases and I hope that very soon I’ll be able to get my hands on Red Island House by Andrea Lee, Renegade Flight by Andrea Tang, and Bruised by Tanya Boteju.

And speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Patricia and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as Lost in the Never Woods, Mixed Plate, and The Ladies of the Secret Circus, and more.

And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

Red Widow by Alma Katsu 

Many of you are familiar with Katsu and her supernatural/horror novels, but this new book is subject Katsu is intimately familiar with: national security. Katsu has been an intelligence officer for over 30 years, and she has channeled her expertise into an exhilarating spy thriller! Red Widow is about two CIA agents working in the Russian division to stop a threat to national security that is coming from inside the agency. Agents Lyndsey Duncan and Theresa Warner must work around the clock to ferret out the mole (ha, rodent puns) before more people lose their lives.

Backlist bump: Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews

Delicates (Sheets) by Brenna Thummler

This is another one of those “I am mentioning the sequel’s release to draw your attention to the first book” recommendations. These are wonderful graphic novels written with middle grade readers, but perfect for anyone who wants a lovely haunting story. In Sheets, the first book, we meet Marjorie Glatt, a teenager trying to get through school and run her parents’ laundromat. While Marjorie deals with her daytime problems, at night the laundromat is visited by Wendell, the ghost of a young boy who is having a hard time adapting to the afterlife. It soon becomes apparent that these two are in need of each other’s friendship to help them get through the tough times. The second book, Delicates, is also wonderful and is about friends and fitting in. I highly recommend these books for both personal and classroom reading.

Backlist bump: Sheets by Brenna Thummler

The Unbroken by C. L. Clark

And last, but not least, this is an excellent new debut fantasy filled with action! Touraine was conscripted into her country’s army as a child ad raised to be the perfect soldier. But when her company is sent back to her homeland, she is contacted by Luca, who is looking for a traitor. Luca needs someone to help her rebel against her cruel uncle, who sits on the throne. Touraine is at first against Luca’s request, but things become more complicated when she becomes the princess’s lover. Can Touraine go against everything she’s been trained to do—and even if she can, will it be enough to lead a rebellion? This is a taut novel of revolution and responsibility, filled with hard choices and heart!

Backlist bump: The Tiger’s Daughter by K Arsenault Rivera

Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

Happy Tuesday, book lovers! I hope you have been able to quickly recalibrate after the time change. It doesn’t usually affect me, because what is sleep, lol, but my cats are all out of whack. Or maybe they just want me to think that and they’re secretly trying to trick me into double-feedings.

Moving on, today’s newsletter is a little different. I am bummed to say that I did not read and enjoy many of today’s new releases. That isn’t to say there aren’t a lot of great books out today—there absolutely will be!—just that I didn’t enjoy most of today’s releases I was able to get my hands on and read early. And the ones that I did enjoy, I already talked about on the podcast today. But there are certainly some releases today I can’t wait to read, like Firekeeper’s Daughter by Angeline Boulley and The Dating Plan by Sara Desai.

So today’s newsletter is a round-up of seven books that have already been released this year that I loved and thought they should be pointed out again. In the end, it’s all about getting great books into your hands so you can put them in your brains. Because all I want is to help you find books you’ll love! And I should be back to my regularly scheduled weekly new release recommendations next week.

But first, about those great new books coming out today that I did read: On this week’s episode of All the Books! Tirzah and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as The Dating Plan, The Jigsaw Man, The Mirror Season, and more. And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

Who is Maud Dixon? by Alexandra Andrews

Florence Darrow is misanthropic low-level publishing employee who dreams of being a famous writer. After she is fired from her job, she is surprised to receive an offer to be Maud Dixon’s assistant. The reclusive author published a highly acclaimed bestselling novel and Florence would love to work by her side and learn from her. But ‘Maud Dixon’ is really Helen Wilcox, and only Helen’s editor and now Florence know that. Florence accepts the job and moves into Helen’s secluded home, where Helen is desperately trying to finish her second novel. Shortly after, Helen flies them to Morocco to do more research for her book. But then there is a horrible car accident, and Florence wakes up in the hospital with no memory of what happened, or where Helen is… I loved this book! It moves at a whiplash pace, and it’s funny and suspenseful at the same time.

We Could Be Heroes by Mike Chen

Jamie and Zoe are strangers who recently awoke with no memory of who they are or how they got there. And oh yeah—they now have superpowers! Jamie uses his powers for evil, erasing people’s minds to pull what he considers victimless crimes: bank robberies. Zoe spends her days catching criminals instead. When something happens while they’re both at a support group for people with memory loss leads, they realize their fates are linked. Together, they seek the truth of their pasts and the origin of their powers, while becoming besties along the way. We Could Be Heroes is a refreshing take on superpower origin stories, full of adventure, laughs, and heart. I enjoyed reading a happy, kind hero story for a change.

The Low Desert: Gangster Stories by Tod Goldberg

Let me say up front: This is a dark, often violent collection, but it’s also a brilliant, compelling collection. I wouldn’t be telling you about it if it wasn’t incredible. Goldberg expands on the stories of characters from his Gangsterland novels to create taut, funny, unforgettable tales about family, crimes, and human connection. And don’t worry, you don’t have to have read the novels to read these stories. You just have to be ready to have your mind blown. This is perfect for fans of Donald Ray Pollock, William Boyle, and Harry Crews.

The Rib King by Ladee Hubbard

The Rib King takes place in two parts in the early 20th century. The first part is set in the prestigious home of a once-affluent white family. As the African American staff try to come up with ways to stretch what little they have to work with, there is fighting over recent changes to the staff. August Sitwell has worked for the Barclays since he was a young orphan, but his feelings about his employment and the world are starting to change. And the second section is set ten years later, after a horrific crime at the home, and follows one of the former maids, Jennie, as she attempts to grow her own beauty care business, but keeps finding her dealings overshadowed by her time at the home. I cannot decide which section I enjoyed more! It was such an exciting juxtaposition. The further I got in the second section, the more I saw the genius of the first as well. It’s such a powerful novel that I immediately read it again because I didn’t want to lose that feeling it gave my brain. 

Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell

This is a touching space opera romance! Prince Kiem is a wild child-turned-adult and an embarrassment to the royal family. So the Emperor decides to marry him off to the widower of a prince on the Empire’s newest vassal planet to keep the peace. Count Jainan doesn’t want to marry any more than Kiem, but they see it as their duty. But soon Kiem learns that Jainan’s husband’s death may not have been an accident. And despite the fact that feelings start to grow between them, Jainan is a suspect. Is Kiem putting himself in danger by marrying Jainan, or can he help him solve his previous husband’s death and save the empire? This is an exciting and tender book about responsibility, love, and grief.

Picnic In the Ruins by Todd Robert Petersen

This book is like if the Coen Brothers wrote and directed episodes of Northern Exposure. It’s a crime novel about who owns the past. A young anthropologist who gets caught up a bungled theft, after she accidentally sees the priceless items. The inept thieves are a pair of esoteric brothers, well known to the local police. But their inability to carry out the job correctly means a cleaner has to come to town, and he’s ten times scarier than anyone else. This is a thrill but also one of the funniest books I have read in years. It has several intense chase scenes, fantastic dialogue, and a lot of smart discussion about who owns history.

We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Stewart

Remy is a Chorister aboard a nuclear submarine, one of many of an order of monks who have been circling the globe since the annihilation of the world above. The monks are in possession of the last nuclear missile and are waiting for a sign from God to launch it. But when the chaplain gives Remy the key to the missile before he dies, it’s because he no longer thinks they should launch it—and he only trusts Remy to keep it from happening. But the caplain’s power-mad replacement is hellbent on releasing the last bomb and ending everything, and even resorts to using Remy’s best friend as a pawn to try and get what he wants. Can Remy save what is left of the world and keep the key out the hands of the new caplain? I thought this was perfectly paced and it seemed entirely plausible.


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

Happy Tuesday! After several gray, snowy, windy weeks, the sun has been shining here in Maine for three days in a row. I’m almost afraid to even mention it, because I don’t want to scare it off. But it’s wonderful! If it wasn’t 30 degrees outside, I would be out on the porch in my hammock right now. (Well, not right now. Right now I am talking to you, lol.)

I’m looking forward to a lot of today’s new releases and I hope that very soon I’ll be able to get my hands on Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul? by Jesse McCarthy, Sarahland by Sam Cohen, and Starfish by Lisa Fipps.

And speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Vanessa and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as How Beautiful We Were, Women and Other Monsters, The Ghost Variations, and more.

And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

Sweet & Bitter Magic by Adrienne Tooley

I don’t know about you, but I have found myself sinking deeper and deeper into fantasy reads as this pandemic goes on. So much of my reading these days is not based in reality—and it’s awesome!

This is a fantastic standalone debut about witches and curses, which (witch?) are two great tastes that taste great together. Tamsin is a powerful witch who has been exiled by the Coven and cursed with the inability to love on her own. If she wants to feel love, she has to steal the emotion from others. Wren is a source: she is made of magic, but unable to perform magic herself. Sources are required to be turned over to the Coven to be raised and trained, but Wren’s father defied orders and hid her away. Now Wren’s father is sick and Wren wants to make a deal with Tamsin: if Tamsin exposes the witch who made her father ill, Wren will give her all the love she has for her father, which should last her a long time.

But just because they’re going to exchange love doesn’t mean they have to like one another. And they don’t. But as Tamsin and Wren embark on a dangerous adventure to find the culprit behind Wren’s father’s illness, time has a way of magically changing things. This is an excellent queer YA fantasy and I hope Tooley changes her mind about it being a standalone!

Backlist bump: Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race by Walter Isaacson

Issacson is well-known for his in-depth, award winning biographies of people such as Steve Jobs and Leonardo Da Vinci. He now turns his attention to Nobel Prize winner Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues, who are working to develop gene editing. In this thoroughly researched account, we learn not just about Doudna and her work, but what gene editing is, what its use means for science, and the moral issues surrounding human’s ability to change the code in our genes. Such future work could make humankind less susceptible to viruses and more. It’s mind-boggling how far science has advanced. If you love fast-paced science books about fascinating subjects that really make you think, this is the book for you! (And remember it at the holidays this year when you need a good history book to give as a gift for your dad, grandma, etc.)

Backlist bump: Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Fatal Fried Rice: A Noodle Shop Mystery by Vivien Chien 

It seems hard to believe that I have been enjoying this delightful series for seven books now, but here we are. If you are a fan of cozy mysteries, I highly recommend picking up this series. It’s about Lana Lee, a young woman who runs her family’s Chinese restaurant in Cleveland, something she didn’t think would happen when she was younger. The first book starts with her return home and the murder of the restaurant’s landlord. Lana works to clear her name and find the culprit so that the handsome detective investigating the case will stop thinking she’s guilty.

Through the series, Lana and Detective Adam investigate suspicious deaths that happen around them. In this last book, Lana and Adam must figure out who has murdered Lana’s cooking instructor to get Lana’s name off the list of suspects. If you like your crime novels with little blood, sex, or violence, and enjoy witty banter and flat-out charm, pick this series up today! (And look at that cover! Book covers with images of skulls made from other things are my kryptonite.)

Backlist bump: Death by Dumpling: A Noodle Shop Mystery by Vivien Chien


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

First Tuesday of March Megalist!

Hello, Tuesday friends—it’s another beautiful day in the book neighborhood! Earlier this morning, I was thinking about how I have written over 1000 intros for Book Riot newsletters now. That is a lot of salutations. And just like those 1000+ other newsletters, I have so many books to tell you about today!

It’s a huge day in the new book world, and it includes new releases from big names such as Isabel Allende, Kazuo Ishiguro, Victoria Schwab, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Russell Banks, and Stephen King. I did get to read several of today’s books, but there are still soooo many more on this list that I can’t wait to read, like Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira, The Lowering Days by Gregory Brown, Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer by Jamie Figueroa, and The Northern Reach by W.S. Winslow.

As with each first Tuesday megalist, I am putting a ❤️ next to the books that I have had the chance to read and loved. You can also hear about several new releases on this week’s episode of the All the Books! Danika and I discussed In the Quick, Infinity Reaper, Infinite Country, and more. Okay—everyone buckled in? Get ready to click your little hearts out, because here come the books! – XO, Liberty

In the Quick by Kate Hope Day ❤️

I Think I Love You by Auriane Desombre

The Kitchen without Borders: Recipes and Stories from Refugee and Immigrant Chefs by The Eat Offbeat Chefs, Siobhan Wallace Penny De Los Santos (Photographer)

The Lowering Days by Gregory Brown

The Speed of Light by Elissa Grossell Dickey

Rice (Savor the South Cookbooks) by Michael W. Twitty

The Snatch Racket: The Kidnapping Epidemic That Terrorized 1930s America by Carolyn Cox

Black Boy Out of Time: A Memoir by Hari Ziyad

Catalogue Baby: A Memoir of (In)fertility by Myriam Steinberg, Christache

Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding by Larry Olmsted 

Wedding Station by David Downing 

Yolk by Mary H.K. Choi ❤️

Follow Your Arrow by Jessica Verdi 

Vera by Carol Edgarian  

The Queen’s Secret by Melissa de la Cruz

The Empathy Diaries: A Memoir by Sherry Turkle 

Abundance by Jakob Guanzon

What’s Mine and Yours by Naima Coster ❤️

Too Small by Tola Atinuke, Onyinye Iwu

Tomorrow Sex Will Be Good Again: Women and Desire in the Age of Consent by Katherine Angel

One Step to You by Federico Moccia, Antony Shugaar (translator) 

Mirror Lake by Andrée A. Michaud, J. C. Sutcliffe (translator)

Infinite Country by Patricia Engel ❤️

Infinity Reaper (Infinity Cycle) by Adam Silvera

A Window to Heaven: The Daring First Ascent of Denali: America’s Wildest Peak by Patrick Dean

Bring Back Our Girls: The Untold Story of the Global Search for Nigeria’s Missing Schoolgirls by Joe Parkinson, Drew Hinshaw

An Unexpected Peril (A Veronica Speedwell Mystery ) by Deanna Raybourn

Spilt Milk by Courtney Zoffness

Men Who Hate Women: From Incels to Pickup Artists: The Truth about Extreme Misogyny and How it Affects Us All by Laura Bates

Who is Maud Dixon? by Alexandra Andrews ❤️

Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine by Olivia Campbell 

Winterborne Home for Mayhem and Mystery by Ally Carter

Decoding “Despacito”: An Oral History of Latin Music by Leila Cobo 

gory details

Gory Details: Adventures From the Dark Side of Science by Erika Engelhaupt ❤️

Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am by Julia Cook

frank: sonnets by Diane Seuss

Windhall by Ava Barry

The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer by Liza Rodman, Jennifer Jordan

The Bright and the Pale by Jessica Rubinkowski 

Bridge of Souls (City of Ghosts #3) by Victoria Schwab ❤️

The Life of the Mind by Christine Smallwoo

Home is Not a Country by Safia Elhillo

Covet (Crave 3) by Tracy Wolff 

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Later by Stephen King 

Machinehood by S.B. Divya

Burning Girls and Other Stories by Veronica Schanoes ❤️

The Girl Explorers: The Untold Story of the Globetrotting Women Who Trekked, Flew, and Fought Their Way Around the World by Jayne Zanglein

The Scapegoat by Sara Davis

A History of Scars: A Memoir by Laura Lee

The Salt in Our Blood by Ava Morgyn

Flight: A Novel of a Daring Escape During World War II by Vanessa Harbour

The Nightland Express by J. M. Lee

A Boob’s Life: How America’s Obsession Shaped Me―and You by Leslie Lehr

We Begin at the End by Chris Whitaker ❤️

Every Last Fear by Alex Finlay 

Float Plan by Trish Doller  

Down Comes the Night by Allison Saft 

The Barbizon: The Hotel That Set Women Free by Paulina Bren

Foregone by Russell Banks

Justine by Forsyth Harmon

Red Rover by Christopher Krovatin

Oslo, Maine by Marcia Butler

More Than You Can Handle: A Rare Disease, A Family in Crisis, and the Cutting-Edge Medicine That Cured the Incurable by Miguel Sancho

Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig

Endpapers: A Family Story of Books, War, Escape, and Home by Alexander Wolff

The Committed by Viet Thanh Nguyen ❤️

The Incredible Winston Browne by Sean Dietrich 

The Castle School (for Troubled Girls) by Alyssa Sheinmel

The Stolen Kingdom by Jillian Boehme

The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths ❤️

Antonio by Beatriz Bracher, Adam Morris (translator)

The High-Rise Diver by Julia von Lucadou, Sharmila Cohen (translator)

The Northern Reach by W.S. Winslow

You’re Leaving When?: Adventures in Downward Mobility by Annabelle Gurwitch

Brother, Sister, Mother, Explorer by Jamie Figueroa

A Desolation Called Peace (Teixcalaan Book 2) by Arkady Martine ❤️

Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira

The Lost Apothecary by Sarah Penner ❤️

The Gentle Barbarian by Bohumil Hrabal, Paul Wilson (translator)

The Conductors by Nicole Glover ❤️

Dead Space by Kali Wallace

Lightseekers by Femi Kayode

The Restoration of Celia Fairchild by Marie Bostwick 

Feelings: A Story in Seasons by Manjit Thapp 

A Game of Cones (An Ice Cream Parlor Mystery) by Abby Collette ❤️

Sparks Like Stars by Nadia Hashimi 

Good Eggs by Rebecca Hardiman

The Soul of a Woman by Isabel Allende

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New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

Hello, Tuesday friends, it’s time to get excited about new books! Can you believe February is practically over already. THAT was fast. 2021 has been flat-out amazing when it comes to new book releases. Two of my favorites of the year have already been released—The Rib King by Ladee Hubbard and We Could Be Heroes by Mike Chen—and next week another of my favorites is out—In the Quick by Kate Hope Day. You’re going to love them! Also, I’ve been pretty active on Twitter lately and I’m always around on Instagram, and I love to hear from people who have loved a book I’ve recommended. 😍

I’m looking forward to a lot of today’s new releases and I hope that very soon I’ll be able to get my hands on Escaping Exodus: Symbiosis by Nicky Drayden, Love Is for Losers by Wibke Brueggemann, and Nubia: Real One by L. L. McKinney and Robyn Smith.

And speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Patricia and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as The City of Good Death, Raceless, The Blizzard Party, and more. (Also, last week I didn’t notice the typo in Tirzah’s name—sorry, Tirzah! Related: Check out her upcoming book, Pride and Premeditation.)

And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

The Upstairs House by Julia Fine

Megan, a writer working on a book about children’s literature, has been anticipating the birth of her first child. But from the very beginning, it is not quite what she was expecting. She is sore and tired all the time, and worried that she doesn’t feel an attachment with her new daughter.

This worry only grows when Megan comes home from the hospital and her husband leaves almost immediately for a business trip. But help arrives in the form of a kind upstairs neighbor, who offers to help out with the baby. But the weird thing is that the neighbor is living in a part of the house that didn’t used to exist and the neighbor herself is children’s book writer Margaret Wise Brown—who has been dead for quite some time. (Yes, the Margaret Wise Brown, author of many books including Goodnight Moon.)

But tired and despondent as she is, Megan is grateful for the assistance, until it turns out that Margaret has unfinished business and Megan and the baby are pulled further and further into her plans. As events turn more chaotic and dangerous, Megan must decide how to free herself and her baby from the situation.

This is a great, intense story of the unrealistic expectations women are fed around giving birth and having children, and the need for further understanding and compassion around postpartum depression. (Also, this is a bit ghoulish, but did you know Margaret Wise Brown died from complications from doing a high kick while she was still recovering from surgery? I learned that in high school and it still haunts me.)

Backlist bump: The Need by Helen Phillips

Smoke by Joe Ide

This is the fifth book in the IQ series now, which seems impossible. I wanted to point it out because it’s a great series (which is being made into a television series by Snoop Dogg!)

The main character is Isaiah Quintabe, also known as IQ, a resident of one of LA’s toughest neighborhoods who uses his Sherlock Holmes-like abilities of observation and deduction to help solve cases that are written off or ignored by the police. His past cases include the death threats against a rap mogul, dangerous loan sharks and stalkers, a missing mother, and arms dealers.

In his fifth book, IQ will have to decide if he wants to break cover to help a man on the hunt for the state’s most prolific serial killer, while his partner, Dodson, has some difficult decisions to make. Some series you can read out of order, but I highly recommend starting at the beginning with this one, because a lot of plot hinges on past events. But don’t worry, it’s worth it. IQ is the great contemporary Sherlock the 21st century needs.

Backlist bump: IQ by Joe Ide

The Lost Soul by Olga Tokarczuk, Joanna Concejo (Illustrator), Antonia Lloyd-Jones (Translator)

This is a beautiful, contemplative story by Nobel Pirize winner Tokarczuk, author of Flights and Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead, with unbelievably outstanding illustrations by Concejo.

The story is about a man who is sad and unhappy and so he goes to the doctor, who tells him he has lost his soul. The doctor explains the nature of souls and tells the man he needs to slow his life down. The story is set in the middle of the book, with the illustrations leading up to the story in black-and-white, and the images after the story bursting with color. It’s a gorgeous book about taking time to appreciate what you have and what is around you. Remember this one when it’s time to give a graduation gift!

Backlist bump: The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen Collins


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

Happy Tuesday, readers! I hope you had a great weekend. You are never going to believe this but I spent my weekend—get ready—reading books. Haha, JK, that’s a regular weekend for me. Bonus: I read something I really enjoyed that I can share with you today! I’m excited about a lot of today’s new releases and I hope that very soon I’ll be able to get my hands on Jaguars’ Tomb by Angélica Gorodischer, the reissue of No More Lies by Dick Gregory, and The Mission House by Carys Davies.

Speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Torzah and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as The Memory Theater, First Comes Like, The Echo Wife, and more.

This one is for you, Cassie: And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

Soulstar (The Kingston Cycle Book 3) by C. L. Polk 

This is the third book in a series, but because I love this series so much, I wanted to make sure that I either 1) let you know the third one was coming out or 2) introduced you to this excellent series! It’s set in an alternate Edwardian England, where magic is real and witches exist.

In the first book, we meet Miles Singer, a magic-marked human who has been hiding out as a doctor in a veteran’s hospital after the war. Er, for reasons. He has been successful in keeping his identity—and his abilities— a secret until a dying patient is brought in and reveals Miles’s identity. Now Miles must figure out who the patient was and how he knew the truth. Luckily, a handsome stranger is willing to give Miles help with his investigation.

The next books revolve around related characters from the first book, and all are excellent. If you love an alternative history fantasy series, I cannot recommend this one enough!

Backlist bump: Witchmark (The Kingston Cycle, 1) by C. L. Polk

The Witch of Eye by Kathryn Nuernberger

And speaking of witches: this is a fascinating, brutal collection of essays about the terrors visited upon the (almost entirely) women who have been accused of witchcraft over the centuries. Nuernberger divides each chapter into the story of a specific victim from history and examines the hypocrisies, horrors, and ignorance that led to each of their demise, along with stories of women in her own life and her observations of the world. Make no mistake, it is hard to read sometimes, but Nuernberger has done an engrossing job discussing their deaths as tied to the beauty and terror of nature. This book will not be for everyone, but I am glad I read it.

(CW for graphic descriptions of the torture and death of people accused of witchcraft.)

Backlist bump: Witches of America by Alex Mar

How to Order the Universe by María José Ferrada, Elizabeth Bryer (translator)

And this is the book I mentioned on All the Books as wanting to read. I took the time over the weekend to fit it in, and I thought it was great!

It’s a Paper Moon-esque story set in Pinochet-era Chile, and follows seven-year-old M. She is extremely intelligent and precocious and is fascinated by her father’s work. D is a traveling salesman who sells tools, and M convinces him to write her excuse notes for school and instead take her with him on his sales calls. This works to D’s advantage, because people are less likely to say no or yell at him in front of a little kid. M also uses this to her advantage to extort toys from her dad.

Their arrangement works so well that he even lends her out to another salesman to help with his visits, and M is raking in the loot. But everything changes when their friendship with a photographer named E leads to tragedy. It’s a really bittersweet story of a girl’s love for her dad and the things in life that even the most intelligent children don’t understand when they are young.

(CW for violence and death, homophobic language and racist remarks, and children smoking cigarettes.)

Backlist bump: Crooked Heart by Lissa Evans


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

Hooray, It’s Time for New Books!

It’s Tuuuuuuuuuesday! That means there are oodles of great new books being released out into the world today. I am most eager to get my hands on The Velocity of Revolution by Marshall Ryan Maresca, A Tip for the Hangman by Allison Epstein, and Nuestra América by Claudio Lomnitz. Especially since I have nothing to read. 😉

Speaking of today’s great books, for this week’s episode of All the Books! Vanessa and I discussed some of the wonderful books that we’ve read, such as The Gilded Ones, Kink, The Witch’s Heart, and more.

And now, it’s time for everyone’s favorite gameshow: AHHHHHH MY TBR! Here are today’s contestants:

In the Shadow of the Moon: America, Russia, and the Hidden History of the Space Race by Amy Cherrix

My goal this year (and every year, it seems) is to read more nonfiction. I have not been very successful, but I did get to read this story of the United States and Russia and their race to the moon. I learned a lot about the men behind the first rockets into space that we didn’t learn in school—like how one of the engineers was a former Nazi officer—and their bitter rivalry. Outer space itself in general kind of weirds me out if I think about it for too long, but reading about the science and politics and dirty secrets surrounding mankind trying to visit it was just my speed.

Backlist bump: Hidden Figures: Young Readers’ Edition by Margot Lee Shetterly

A Pho Love Story by Loan Le

This is a cute debut young adult novel about two Vietnamese-American teens whose families own competing restaurants. Bao Nguyen and Linh Mai both work hard for their parents, even if their parents won’t admit it. The two have always steered clear of one another, but after an accidental meeting, they are beginning to wonder what caused the rift between their families. And there’s something else—they’re totally into one another. How will their parents react to their children being involved with someone from a competing pho restaurant, when they aren’t generous with their affection and understanding on a regular day? (Fun fact: Loan Le also works in publishing and is the editor of Good Neighbors by Sarah Langan, one of my favorite novels of the year.)

Backlist bump: When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Dreyer’s English (Adapted for Young Readers): Good Advice for Good Writing by Benjamin Dreyer

I just realized all my picks today are young adult books, but I can’t help it because these are the ones I liked best! I loved the adult edition of Dreyer’s English and I think it’s genius to have one for budding writers. It makes so much sense to help young writers as they’re starting out, and Dreyer is the King of Grammar, so he’s the perfect person to teach them! He’s also hella witty and funny. I am all for more Dreyer’s English everything: Dreyer’s English bath bombs, Dreyer’s English air fresheners, Dreyer’s English pet shampoo, Dreyer’s English breakfast cereal—bring it on.

Backlist bump: STET! Dreyer’s English: A Game for Language Lovers, Grammar Geeks, and Bibliophiles by Benjamin Dreyer


Thank you, as always, for joining me each week as I rave about books! I am wishing the best for all of you in whatever situation you find yourself in now. – XO, Liberty

Categories
New Books

First Tuesday of February Megalist!

Holy cats, are you even ready to handle the sheer number of amazing books coming our way today?!? You might want to put on a helmet and safety googles just to read this email! As with each first Tuesday megalist, I am putting a ❤️ next to the books that I have had the chance to read and loved. (Thank you, December break!) I did get to a few of today’s books, but there are still soooo many more on this list that I can’t wait to read, like U UP? by Catie Disabato, Love Is an Ex-Country by Randa Jarrar, and Surviving the White Gaze: A Memoir by Rebecca Carroll.

You can also hear about several new releases on this week’s episode of the All the Books! Danika and I discussed Two Truths and a Lie, A Taste of Love, Winter’s Orbit, and more. Okay—everyone buckled in? Here come the books! – XO, Liberty

Two Truths and a Lie: A Murder, a Private Investigator, and Her Search for Justice by Ellen McGarrahan ❤️

Milk Fed by Melissa Broder 

Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell ❤️

Love Is an Ex-Country by Randa Jarrar

The Project by Courtney Summers ❤️

A Dowry of Blood by S.T. Gibson

Good Neighbors by Sarah Langan ❤️

A Taste For Love by Jennifer Yen

The Other Mothers: Two Women’s Journey to Find the Family That Was Always Theirs by Jennifer Berney

Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age by Annalee Newitz

Hadley and Grace by Suzanne Redfearn 

I am The Rage by Martina McGowan and Diana Ejaita

Milk Blood Heat: Stories by Dantiel W. Moniz ❤️

Candy Hearts by Tommy Siegel

The Low Desert: Gangster Stories by Tod Goldberg ❤️

U UP? by Catie Disabato

Strange Bedfellows: Adventures in the Science, History, and Surprising Secrets of STDs by Ina Park 

Run for Cover (Michael Gannon Series) by Michael Ledwidge 

Girls with Bright Futures: A Novel by Tracy Dobmeier and Wendy Katzman ❤️

The Best of R. A. Lafferty by R.A. Lafferty 

Soul City: Race, Equality, and the Lost Dream of an American Utopia by Thomas Healy

A Bright Ray of Darkness by Ethan Hawke

Live; live; live by Jonathan Buckley

Ridgerunner by Gil Adamson

Rise of the Red Hand (The Mechanists) by Olivia Chadha ❤️

The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah

Untraceable by Sergei Lebedev and Antonina W. Bouis

The Mysterious Disappearance of Aidan S. (as told to his brother) by David Levithan

Animal, Vegetable, Junk by Mark Bittman 

Love in English by Maria E. Andreu

The Kindest Lie by Nancy Johnson ❤️

Wild Swims: Stories by Dorthe Nors, Misha Hoekstra (translator)

Prosopagnosia by Sònia Hernández, Samuel Rutter (translator)

The Bad Muslim Discount by Syed M. Masood

Black Magic: What Black Leaders Learned from Trauma and Triumph by Chad Sanders

What Big Teeth by Rose Szabo 

Do Better: Spiritual Activism for Fighting and Healing from White Supremacy by Rachel Ricketts

What Is Life?: Five Great Ideas in Biology by Paul Nurse

Muted by Tami Charles

Resetting the Table: Straight Talk About the Food We Grow and Eat by Robert Paarlberg.

The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks (Young Readers Edition) by Jeanne Theoharis, Brandy Colbert 

This Is Not the Jess Show by Anna Carey

100 Boyfriends by Brontez Purnell ❤️

Heartwarming: How Our Inner Thermostat Made Us Human by Hans Rocha Ijzerman

Truly Like Lightning by David Duchovny  

The Hatmakers by Tamzin Merchant

The Afterlife of the Party by Marlene Perez

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones ❤️

Yesterday Is History by Kosoko Jackson

girl stuff. by Lisi Harrison

Loud Black Girls: 20 Black Women Writers Ask: What’s Next? by Yomi Adegoke, Elizabeth Uviebinené

Everything That Burns: An Enchantée Novel by Gita Trelease

The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation by Anna Malaika Tubbs ❤️

Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob by Russell Shorto

An Anatomy of Pain: How the Body and the Mind Experience and Endure Physical Suffering by Abdul-Ghaaliq Lalkhen

The Last Tiara by M.J. Rose 

Girl A by Abigail Dean

Beneath the Keep: A Novel of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

Fake Accounts by Lauren Oyler ❤️

This Golden Flame by Emily Victoria

The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner 

Send for Me by Lauren Fox

A Place to Hang the Moon by Kate Albus

Mortal Remains by Mary Ann Fraser

The Women’s History of the Modern World: How Radicals, Rebels, and Everywomen Revolutionized the Last 200 Years by Rosalind Miles

What Doesn’t Kill You: A Life with Chronic Illness – Lessons from a Body in Revolt by Tessa Miller

Surviving the White Gaze: A Memoir by Rebecca Carroll

The Data Detective: Ten Easy Rules to Make Sense of Statistics by Tim Harford

Love Is a Revolution by Renée Watson

Poetics of Work by Noémi Lefebvre, Sophie Lewis (translator)

Floating in a Most Peculiar Way: A Memoir by Louis Chude-Sokei

My Year Abroad by Chang-rae Lee ❤️

Beethoven Variations: Poems on a Life by Ruth Padel 

The Year I Flew Away by Marie Arnold

What Is Life?: Five Great Ideas in Biology by Paul Nurse

Halfway Home : Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration by Reuben Jonathan Miller

Muse by Brittany Cavallaro

Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know by Adam Grant 

Annie and the Wolves by Andromeda Romano-Lax

The Mercenary by Paul Vidich

Flood City by Daniel José Older ❤️

Lone Stars by Justin Deabler

The Survivors by Jane Harper

This Close to Okay by Leesa Cross-Smith ❤️

City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks

Finlay Donovan Is Killing It by Elle Cosimano 

Landslide by Susan Conley ❤️

The Obsession by Jesse Q Sutanto

Blood Grove by Walter Mosley

A History of What Comes Next: A Take Them to the Stars Novel by Sylvain Neuvel ❤️

Speculative Los Angeles edited by Denise Hamilton

Killer Content by Olivia Blacke

The Spirit of Music: The Lesson Continues by Victor L. Wooten 

Make Up Break Up by Lily Menon 

God I Feel Modern Tonight: Poems from a Gal About Town by Catherine Cohen

Pink: Poems by Sylvie Baumgartel 

Like Streams to the Ocean: Notes on Ego, Love, and the Things That Make Us Who We Are by Jedidiah Jenkins 

Land of Big Numbers: Stories by Te-Ping Chen ❤️

Leave Out the Tragic Parts: A Grandfather’s Search for a Boy Lost to Addiction by Dave Kindred 

The Removed: A Novel by Brandon Hobson

Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain ❤️

A View from Abroad: The Story of John and Abigail Adams in Europe by Jeanne E. Abrams

Made in China: A Prisoner, an SOS Letter, and the Hidden Cost of America’s Cheap Goods by Amelia Pang ❤️

Bad Habits by Amy Gentry

The Unwilling by John Hart 

Fat Chance, Charlie Vega by Crystal Maldonado ❤️

All the Tides of Fate by Adalyn Grace

We Can Only Save Ourselves by Alison Wisdom ❤️ (Heads up that there is a horrific dog death on the page. I cried the whole rest of the night. 😭)

The Package by Sebastian Fitzek, Jamie Bulloch (Translator)

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