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True Story

Book Deals for Your Friday

It’s basically the weekend! Let’s all get cheap books!

My delight in cheap books continues to know no bounds. I look at them every single day and now I am here to share some cheap nonfiction with you. HAPPY FRIDAY.

Anne Boleyn cover

Anne Boleyn: 500 Years of Lies by Hayley Nolan ($4.99)

Did you see The Other Boleyn Girl? It made me so mad! It basically took every rumor about Anne Boleyn and said “sure, why not.” Well here, Nolan is out to break down those lies and talk about “the shocking suppression of a powerful woman.” Also this cover’s pretty solid. I’m a fan. Learn some facts about the most famous of the Tudor wives!

Out of the Silence: After the Crash by Eduardo Strauch, Mireya Soriano ($4.99)

Welcome to the United States of Anxiety: Observations from a Reforming Neurotic by Jen Lancaster ($4.99)

Monsoon Mansion: A Memoir by Cinelle Barnes ($4.99)

To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder by Nancy Rommelmann ($1.99)

Doc a Memoir cover

Doc: A Memoir by Dwight Gooden and Ellis Henican ($5.99)

I know close to nothing about sports, so I thought this was a medical memoir, but turns out, Dwight Gooden is a baseball player! A baseball player who mainly played in the ’80s and ’90s. This is a memoir of “talent, addiction, and recovery from one of the greatest baseball pitchers of all time.”

Tomboyland: Essays by Melissa Faliveno ($4.99)

For a Song and a Hundred Songs: A Poet’s Journey Through a Chinese Prison by Liao Yiwu and Wenguang Huang ($5.99)

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

New Releases: Protests, Journalism, and a Bee (maybe)

Has it been gloomy and overcast everywhere for two weeks, or is it just Chicago? I work right by some nice windows, but it has not helped recently, because the sky is just a sheet of either white or grey. Until this past weekend! I went out! I saw birds! Cormorants — two cormorants. One didn’t care for the other, but nevertheless! I hope you all are getting out and enjoying some summerness and that the weather is not preventing you due to its weirdly continuous threat of rain.

We’ve got some new releases this week that I will call INTERESTING. Meaning I’d pick these up and see what they were about for sure. Ok, here we go:

The Tiny Bee cover

The Tiny Bee That Hovers at the Center of the World by David Searcy

Sometimes I’m just like “sure, why not” about a new release. Searcy goes “from the decaying architectural wonder that is the town of Arcosanti, Arizona, to driving the vast, open Texas highway in his much-abused college VW Beetle,” which sounds a lot like a holdover book from the ’60s, but maybe we need a book about a person going on a meandering trip and contemplating life during these times. Times are weird.

Surviving Mexico Cover

Surviving Mexico: Resistance and Resilience among Journalists in the Twenty-first Century by Celeste González de Bustamante, Jeannine E. Relly

Two journalism professors tackle what is happening with journalists in Mexico. Namely, it is a very hard thing to be right now. Since 2000, over 150 journalists have been killed in Mexico, and Bustamente and Relly “examine the networks of political power, business interests, and organized crime that threaten and attack Mexican journalists, who forge ahead despite the risks.” Their book highlights a crisis that, despite its proximity, is little known in America.

No Study Without Struggle cover

No Study Without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education by Leigh Patel

I know, there are a lot of serious reads this week! I don’t know what to tell you; publishers looked at mid-July and said “that’s it. The heart of summer. Release the solemn books.” I would like to point out that this one is short (208 pages) and covers something important — namely “how student protest against structural inequalities on campus pushes academic institutions to reckon with their legacy built on slavery and stolen Indigenous lands.” Keep protesting, students!

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

National Book Award Picks

I’m gonna be honest, I don’t follow book awards usually beyond scanning winner lists to see what nonfiction is on it (have I read it? no — but my For Real podcast co-host Kim probably has). I’m intrigued by the National Book Award though!

It’s given “by writers to writers,” so definitely not the People’s Choice Awards of the bookish world (that would be the Goodreads Awards), and the winners have to be U.S. citizens. It’s been around since 1936, then World War II happened and people said “maybe focus on other things for a minute,” and then it started up again in 1950.

Let’s look at some carefully selected winners, i.e. ones I thought looked interesting:

Wind, Sand and Stars cover

Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (winner: 1939)

Yes, it’s the Little Prince guy! This is one of the rare cases where the English title is more poetic than the French (Terre des hommes? Land of Men? no thank you, please). This primarily contains stories of Saint-Exupéry’s time as an airmail carrier, flying across the Sahara Desert and the Andes Mountains. This includes his crash in the Sahara, which is most definitely included in The Little Prince. I love books from the 1920s/1930s. And I didn’t know this one existed!

Oysters of Locmariaquer Cover

The Oysters of Locmariaquer by Eleanor Clark (winner: 1965)

Yeah, like I’m gonna see a book from almost sixty years ago about oysters and not include it in this list. Look at the beginning of the description: “On the northwest coast of France, just around the corner from the English Channel, is the little town of Locmariaquer.” It sounds like a fairytale! But one with oysters! This is not only about the Belon oysters of Locmariaquer, but also about Brittany and its people.

The Hemingses of Monticello cover

The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family by Annette Gordon-Reed (winner: 2008)

It’s a history of the Hemings family! Yes, the family that includes Sally Hemings. And look, I’m not THAT old and I still remember when it was kind of big news that Jefferson exploited/sexually-assaulted-due-to-the-power-imbalance Hemings. Here, Gordon-Reed “traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family’s dispersal after Jefferson’s death in 1826.” Fair warning that this book is over 900 pages long. But probably a lot of that is endnotes! A bonus of nonfiction: it’s usually not as long as you think it is.

The Dead Are Arising cover

The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne and Tamara Payne (winner: 2020)

The most recent winner! It also won the 2021 Pulitzer. Les Payne passed in 2018, but he was a storied journalist who co-founded the National Association of Black Journalists. He spent almost thirty years on this book, which was finished by his daughter Tamara. Payne wanted to “transform what would become over a hundred hours of interviews into an unprecedented portrait of Malcolm X, one that would separate fact from fiction.” Based on the number of awards and laudatory statements this has received, it appears he succeeded.

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

New Releases: Bring Some Nonfiction on Your Vacation

I feel like I could really go for a readathon right about now. Knock out some of these new reads that are constantly getting released.There are too many good books! Not enough time! But, y’know. Better to have more books than you’ll ever have time to read than not enough books. Sounds terrible.

Summer is a blockbuster time for new releases, so we’ve got some good ones. Let’s get to ’em:

Don't Let It Get You Down cover

Don’t Let It Get You Down: Essays on Race, Gender, and the Body by Savala Nolan Trepczynski

Nolan writes about living in the in-between, from growing up with her Black and Mexican father and white mother to how she “began her first diet at the age of three and has been both fat and painfully thin throughout her life. She has experienced both the discomfort of generational poverty and the ease of wealth and privilege.” She breaks down these themes through twelve essays, including “On Dating White Guys While Me,” “The Body Endures,” and “Fat in Ways White Girls Don’t Understand.”

The Icepick Surgeon Cover

The Icepick Surgeon: Murder, Fraud, Sabotage, Piracy, and Other Dastardly Deeds Perpetrated in the Name of Science by Sam Kean

The author of The Disappearing Spoon comes back in an “untold history of science’s darkest secrets.” We talk about science as a force for good, but what about when it’s not? And how far back does that go? Kean “reveals the origins of much of modern science in the transatlantic slave trade of the 1700s, as well as Thomas Edison’s mercenary support of the electric chair and the warped logic of the spies who infiltrated the Manhattan Project.” Booooo Edison.

Black Box Cover

Black Box: The Memoir That Sparked Japan’s #MeToo Movement by Shiori Ito, Allison Markin Powell (Translated by)

In 2015, journalist Ito charged well-known reporter Noriyuki Yamaguchi with rape. When she went to the police, they told her that her case was a “black box,” which meant it was “untouchable and unprosecutable.” Her memoir was published in 2017 and “became the center of an urgent cultural and legal shift around recognizing sexual assault and gender-based violence.”

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

Book Deals for Your Friday

In a time of Much Going On in the World, I find it soothing to browse ebook deals and spend $2—$6 on a digital version of a nonfiction book. And now I pass that feeling onto you! If that’s also your thing. Otherwise, I dunno, maybe just enjoy looking through some good titles. I would not steer you wrong, for I am captain of this nonfiction newsletter vessel.

The Queen: The Forgotten Life Behind an American Myth by Josh Levin $2.99

A Well Read Woman cover

A Well-Read Woman: The Life, Loves, and Legacy of Ruth Rappaport by Kate Stewart $4.99

It’s about a librarian! Rappaport was a Jewish librarian who grew up in 1920s and ’30s Germany, immigrating to Seattle in 1938. She became a staunch anti-censorship advocate and ended up at the Library of Congress, where she worked for over twenty years. We should have more biographies of librarians. More, I say!

The Cold Vanish: Seeking the Missing in North America’s Wildlands by Jon Billman $3.99

Out of the Silence: After the Crash by Eduardo Strauch with Mireya Soriano $4.99

A River in Darkness: One Man’s Escape from North Korea by Masaji Ishikawa $1.99

The Broken Circle cover

The Broken Circle: A Memoir of Escaping Afghanistan by Enjeela Ahmadi-Miller $4.99

I love this cover, it’s SO pretty. Ahmadi talks about growing up in peaceful Kabul prior to the 1980 Soviet invasion and how the ensuing war separates her family and creates chaos all around her. The center of the book is her family and their quest to reunite.

A Drop of Midnight: A Memoir by Jason Diakité $4.99

Prognosis: A Memoir of My Brain by Sarah Vallance by $4.99

Coming Clean: A Memoir by Kimberly Rae Miller $1.99

Never Stop Walking: A Memoir of Finding Home Across the World by Christina Rickardsson $5.99

Malaya Essays on Freedom cover

Malaya: Essays on Freedom by Cinelle Barnes $4.99

Not to go on about covers again, but LOOK at this. That’s beautiful. Barnes, also author of Monsoon Mansion, writes about leaving the Philippines and living as an undocumented teenager in New York. She marries a white Southerner and has to manage “being a new mother, an immigrant affected by PTSD, and a woman with a brown body in a profoundly white world.”

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

New Releases: So Much Good Stuff Here

After finishing one book in June (the busyness of summer! also I have been watching just so much Superstore), I have been diving back into the reading world. I just finished Punch Me Up to the Gods by Brian Broome, which was SO good. My wife and I have very different reading preferences, so I rarely recommend books to her, but I immediately told her she needed to read it. If you love structure, it’s so structured! And Broome is also a poet, which always adds an extra kick to nonfiction writing.

After a dearth of new releases last week, we are back into a deluge, which is a delight. These all look great, so enjoy:

Vessel a Memoir cover

Vessel: A Memoir by Chongda Cai

Look at this cover. LOOK AT THIS COVER. This is a memoir that “illuminates the lives of rural Chinese workers, offering a portrait of generational strife, family, love, and loss.” Cai grows up in a rural fishing village in Fujian province and, after his father has a stroke, has to start earning money for his family and his father’s medical bills. After going to college, he moves to Beijing, where he eventually becomes the editorial director of GQ China (a twist I was not expecting!). This is being compared to Hillbilly Elegy (hm) and The Glass Castle (huh). It looks really interesting.

Books Promiscuously Read cover

Books Promiscuously Read: Reading as a Way of Life by Heather Cass White

If there’s one thing readers are suckers for, it’s books about how great reading is. White is an English professor (natch) who splits the book into three different ways of thinking about reading (Play, Transgression, Insight). She “advocates for a life of constant, disorderly, time-consuming reading, and encourages readers to trust in the value of the exhilaration and fascination such reading entails.” Yesss. Also, this is under 200 pages, and I am all for a short book.

Open Skies cover

Open Skies: My Life as Afghanistan’s First Female Pilot by Niloofar Rahmani with Adam Sikes

In 2010, Afghanistan allowed women to join the armed forces, and in 2013, Niloofar Rahmani became Afghanistan’s first female fixed-wing air force pilot. After receiving death threats from the Taliban, who disapproved of her career choice Rahmani sought and was granted asylum in the United States. She is only in her late twenties, but has already done way more than anyone I know.

Black Nerd Problems cover

Black Nerd Problem: Essays by William Evans, Omar Holmon

If this looks familiar, it’s because I talked about it in my second half of 2021 releases newsletter! Still psyched about this one, and it’s out now. Evans and Holmon write about “everything from Mario Kart and The Wire to issues of representation and police brutality across media.” Side note: I asked last time if it’s too late to watch The Wire and I was assured it’s not, so. That’s on my to-do list. Anyway. Check this out!

The Sound of the Sea cover

The Sound of the Sea: Seashells and the Fate of the Oceans by Cynthia Barnett

Nothing makes me more aware of how much I love nonfiction than when I see a title like this and gasp with delight. Who doesn’t want to learn more about seashells! They’re so neat! I’m not super-clear on whether we’re supposed to take them from beaches, but my guess is no if we apply the “take only memories and leave only footprints” forest ranger rule. Do I have some anyway? Maybe. Yes. It’s fine. But back to Barnett’s book, which probably elucidates these points! It is a “history of seashells and the animals that make them, revealing what they have to tell us about nature, our changing oceans, and ourselves.” Ooo.

For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

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True Story

Delightful Nature Reads

It’s warm out! Allergies are rife! Nature abounds. So let’s check out some books about nature for your Friday.

Braiding Sweetgrass Cover

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Botanist and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Kimmerer “shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass ― offer us gifts and lessons.” This was a bestseller and made a lot of “best book” lists. What better time than now to think about the reciprocal relationship we have with nature and what we can do to reflect that?

The Invention of Nature cover

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf

Ok, so there’s nature and then there’s how we conCEPTualize nature. This is the biography of 18th c. Prussian scientist and philosopher von Humboldt. Wulf “makes the case that Humboldt synthesized knowledge from many different fields to form a vision of nature as one interconnected system, that would go on to influence scientists, activists and the public.”

The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs

The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs: Use Outdoor Clues to Find Your Way, Predict the Weather, Locate Water, Track Animals — and Other Forgotten Skills by Tristan Gooley

You know how people used to be able to tell things based on what they saw outside, but now the best most of us can do is be like “hm. Storm’s a-brewin'”? Gooley’s gonna tell you the sun’s direction based on tree roots, what the smell of cinnamon means, and hundreds of tips for forecasting, tracking, and LOcating things. Feel more confident in your outdoorsiness!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Late Bloomers + the ’90s

Not to echo the crowd or anything, but whew, already the end of June, huh? The beginning of this year sounds approximately the same as 37 CE, past-wise, and let’s be fair, considering how many people were supposed to hang tight in their homes, a lot has happened.

Nonfiction continues on though! I was recently talking to someone about how much I love nonfiction, and just — what a great and vast genre. All-encompassing in its embrace! Unless you are made-up. And even then, sometimes that’s okay. We’ve got some new nonfiction releases for your perusal:

Thanks for Waiting

Thanks for Waiting: The Joy (& Weirdness) of Being a Late Bloomer by Doree Shafrir

Feel like you got a late start? Maybe comparing yourself to your peers and feeling weird about it? Shafrir “was an intern at twenty-nine and met her husband on Tinder in her late thirties,” then had a baby at forty-one. She didn’t feel truly successful until age forty. If you need even more evidence that there isn’t an exact timeline for anyone (no one! do what you want when you want!), check out her memoir.

Galaxy Quest cover

Galaxy Quest: The Inside Story by Matt McAllister

BY GRABTHAR’S HAMMER, I love Galaxy Quest. I remember watching that movie as an early teen, seeing the girl faint in the audience when Sigourney Weaver and Tim Allen kissed, and being like “…she gets it.” This behind-the-scenes look goes from the origins to the shoot to its release and legacy, also getting into the starships, aliens, technology (THE CHOMPERS, why are they there), and features interviews with the cast. Man. What a great movie. “Let’s get out of here before one of those things kills Guy!”

Jesus and John Wayne cover

Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Calvin University historian Du Mez looks at the last 75 years of white evangelicalism and how evangelicals “have worked to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism.” Their heroes are manly men (and Reagan) and “chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done.” As someone who was steeped in non-denominational-but-definitely-evangelical-leaning Christianity as a teen in the early 2000s, this is the book from this week that I’m most excited about.

House of Sticks

House of Sticks: A Memoir by Ly Tran

As a toddler, Ly Tran’s family emigrated from Vietnam to Queens. As she grows up in her new country, she faces the dilemma of pressure to conform to its culture, while also living at home with her parents and their Buddhist faith. We look at a lot of memoirs in this newsletter, and this is ideal if you like a coming-of-age story along with (probably unsurprisingly) a story of family. This was in Vogue‘s Best Books to Read 2021.


For more nonfiction new releases, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

True Reads: Summer Facts

Sure, summer weather can be great (esp. if you live in a cold, gross winter climate; lookin’ at you, fellow Midwesterners), but what about summer FACTS? Do I need to quote the opening of Dickens’s Hard Times again?

‘Now, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!’

Sure, the person saying it is bad, but NEVERTHELESS. I thought it’d be fun to check out some summer fact books so you can head into the season armed with knowledge. Mmm. Knowledge.

We Are Each Other's Harvest Cover

We Are Each Other’s Harvest: Celebrating African American Farmers, Land, and Legacy by Natalie Baszile

It is an anthology! I love an anthology. Ok, farmers are summery because I assume that summer is a super busy time for farmers. Maybe that is wrong. Which is why I should read this (to LEARN). But summer on a farm sounds really idyllic, and in Baszile’s book, she collects “photographs, quotes, conversations, and first-person stories to examine black people’s connection to the American land from Emancipation to today.” She also talks about the Returning Generation, which is a name I 100% love, who are coming back to farming and looking to address “issues of food justice, food sovereignty, and reparations.” Also — look at that cover. So good.

Warmth of Other Suns cover

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson

Is this a reach and is that reach the fact that summer is warm and frequently depicted with a prominent sun? Maybe. But anyway — in her extremely lauded book, Wilkerson recounts the story of the Great Migration, which took place from appx 1915-1970 and involved about six million Black Americans moving from the rural South to the rest of the country (primarily to urban areas). Wilkerson interviewed more than a thousand people for this book. It was a massive undertaking for a massive movement.

One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson

Kim and I have talked about this a couple times on the For Real podcast, mainly because she’s not into Bryson’s other books, but I usually cite this one as being less “here is a collection of facts” and more “here is a semi-cohesive story.” The book is entirely focused on the summer of 1927, when a ton of things happened, including the transatlantic flight of Charles Lindbergh; the 1927 NY Yankees; the transition from the Model T Ford to the Model A; the execution of anarchists Sacco and Vanzetti; and more. Lots of big cultural shifts! I really liked this one.

Disposable City cover

Disposable City: Miami’s Future on the Shores of Climate Catastrophe by Mario Alejandro Ariza

I keep thinking about this book. I mention it basically any time Miami comes up. It’s focused on the present and future of Miami, specifically regarding climate change. The description starts with “Miami, Florida, is likely to be entirely underwater by the end of this century.” Which is a real attention-grabber. It talks about residential inequality, racism, and how climate change impacts the day-to-day life of Miami residents. Obviously it’s in the summer list because — look at the cover.

Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence by Joseph J. Ellis

I confess to a weakness for books about the American Revolution. I know it’s not everyone’s cup of tea! (get it?) But this one is SHORT and covers the summer of 1776, so you get this very specific moment when things had started moving into place, and then shows you what was happening on both the British and American sides in a really digestible amount of space. And it’s during the summer!


For more nonfiction reads, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.

Categories
True Story

New Releases: Summertime Edition!

The solstice has passed! Summer is upon us! And some new books, which is very exciting as always. We’ve got some especially good memoirs this week, so let’s go:

Antiman Cover

Antiman: A Hybrid Memoir by Rajiv Mohabir

If you’ve listened to For Real (or possibly read this newsletter), you know I am into memoirs trying something different, if only because we just have so many memoirs that it’s neat to see a new take on them. Mohabir grew up in the U.S. and in his memoir, “blends literary genres to tackle questions of caste, ethnicity, and sexuality, and to explore the author’s experiences as an Indo-Guyanese queer poet.” That’s so many things! He goes from India to Florida to New York City, where a cousin derogatorily calls him “antiman.” This just looks really good and interesting.

cover image of Cultish by Amanda Montell

Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism by Amanda Montell

Sure, we’ve heard of cults, but do we understand their appeal? Like reeeeally understand it? Montell says nope! And that the appeal of cults does not lie in some nebulous brainwashing concept, but in the word choices of their leaders. She also discusses how many groups that could be described as cults are pretty harmless, and how humans tend towards them because we love to belong to groups (seems about right). It’s a pretty fascinating book, from the author of Wordslut.

The Natural Mother of the Child

The Natural Mother of the Child: A Memoir of Nonbinary Parenthood by Krys Malcolm Belc

Belc’s memoir looks at the gendered treatment of giving birth, and what nonbinary parenthood can look like. When he gave birth to his son, it “clarified his gender identity and allowed him to project a more masculine self. And yet, when his partner Anna adopted Samson, the legal documents listed Belc as ‘the natural mother of the child.'” I love the idea of how having a body can influence the perception of a family, and what shifting the way that has been can look like, and this just seems excellent.

How the Word Is Passed cover

How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning With the History of Slavery Across America by Clint Smith

I love landmarks and historical markers and anything drawing attention to the past and how it shaped our present. We don’t have many of those in America when it comes to our history with the enslavement of human beings. Smith takes you around the country to Monticello (Jefferson’s home), the Whitney Plantation, Angola Prison, a Confederate cemetery, and more, as he examines the legacy of slavery.


For more nonfiction new releases, check out the For Real podcast which I co-host with the excellent Kim here at Book Riot. If you have any questions/comments/book suggestions, you can find me on social media @itsalicetime. Until next time, enjoy those facts, fellow nerds.